Shakespeare And Feminism Essay Research Paper By

Shakespeare And Feminism Essay, Research Paper

By analyzing Shakespeare? s intervention of familial ties in his dramas The Life and Death of King John and The Winter? s Tale, we can see how his attitudes and sentiments towards household relationships evolved. In King John ( written between 1594 and 1596 ) , Shakespeare adopts what was so a reasonably conventional attitude towards household relationships: his characters ne’er question the extremely patriarchal household hierarchy. They besides assume that the bulk of married womans will be unfaithful, merely because they are female? nevertheless, they take the charge of criminal conversation instead lightly. By contrast, in The Winter? s Tale ( written between 1610 and 1611 ) , he adopts a much more progressive, feminist position of household relationships. Womans have a higher standing and more power in The Winter? s Tale than they do in King John. Besides, Shakespeare mocks and punishes hubbies that assume their married womans are unfaithful without sound grounds. In both dramas, he criticizes power-based and political relationships, albeit in two really different ways. In all chance, Shakespeare? s progressively extremist believing changed Elizabethan society.

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The household relationships in King John are unimpeachably male-dominated. All of the work forces have some kind of power over their female relations. Constance? s life is ded & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 1028 ; A & # 513 ; erful male characters, seemingly unable to better her ain state of affairs.

Lady Faulconbridge must besides trust upon the work forces in her life. Her honor remainders in the custodies of her boies, Robert and Philip. Robert calls her award into inquiry by claiming that Philip is King Richard I? s natural boy in order to procure his ain heritage ( 1.1.111 ) . Philip supports this claim, abdicating the name of Faulconbridge and following that of Plantagenet. When Lady Faulconbridge realizes that she? s been discovered, she instantly explains and makes alibis for herself to Philip ( now Richard ) , and receives his absolution ( 1.1 ) . Their conversation disturbingly resembles a evildoer? s confession to her priest. She tells Robert, ? Heaven lay non my evildoing to my charge! ? ( 1.1.256 ) . He replies by guaranting her, ? And they shall state, when Richard me begot, / If thou hadst said him nay, it had been sin./ Who says it was, he lies ; I say? twas non? ( 1.1.274-76 ) . This evidently highlights the power derived function between the Lady and her boy.

The most graphic illustration of King John? s patriarchalism is found in the character of John? s niece Blanche. Her full life remainders on the work forces in it, viz. , King John and Lewis the Dauphin. King John marries her to the Dauphin, because, as Eleanor advises him,

For by this knot 1000 shalt so certainly tie

Thy now unsured confidence to the Crown

That yon green male child shall hold no Sun to ripe

The bloom that promiseth a mighty fruit ( 2.1.471-474 ) .

After Blanche? s matrimony, Lewis uses her claim to the throne as a & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 54016 ; ?

& # 54016 ; ? & # 54016 ; ? & # 51712 ; ? & # 49664 ; A & # 1280 ; & # 33806 ; U & # 33885 ; U & # 2048 ; & # 33816 ; & # 65528 ; & # 33817 ; & # 9755 ; & # 9056 ; & # 548 ; & # 1792 ; & # 9219 ; & # 4611 ; & # 57444 ; a & # 24832 ; & # 804 ; & # 2816 ; & # 9219 ; & # 4355 ; & # 53380 ; & # 4610 ; & # 57444 ; a & # 24576 ; & # 53380 ; & # 24834 ; & # 804 ; & # 2816 ; & # 9219 ; & # 3843 ; & # 19588 ; & # 4863 ; & # 57444 ; a & # 24064 ; & # 19588 ; & # 25087 ; & # 804 ; & # 2816 ; & # 9219 ; & # 3841 ; & # 19588 ; & # 4863 ; & # 57444 ; a & # 24064 ; & # 19588 ; & # 25087 ; H & # 5632 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 1792 ; & # 9219 ; & # 4611 ; & # 57444 ; a & # 24832 ; & # 804 ; A & # 1280 ; & # 33806 ; U & # 33885 ; U & # 2048 ; & # 33816 ; & # 65528 ; & # 33817 ; & # 9755 ; & # 9056 ; & # 548 ; & # 1280 ; the mistake was hers? / Which mistake lies on the jeopardies of all husbands/ That marry married womans? ( 1.1.118-20 ) . No 1 contradicts either of them. Additionally, when Bodensee and Queen Eleanor get down to reason, they accuse each other of unfaithfulness and name each other? s boies assholes. All of this shows that in King John, adult females were assumed to be less faithful than work forces.

Despite the fact that wives? criminal conversation undermines the full household construction by naming a adult male? s inheritor? s legitimacy into uncertainty, the chief characters in King John seem to take it in pace. This is coincident with predominating attitudes in early modern times. Elizabethans regarded adult females as weak animals, unable to deny either their baser inherent aptitudes or their persuasive lovers. In fact, the Bastard uses this logic when he exonerates his female parent. He tells her,

Needs must you put your bosom at his dispose,

Subjected testimonial to commanding love,

Against whose rage and unmatch? vitamin D force

The aweless king of beasts could non pay the battle,

Nor maintain his deluxe bosom from Richard? s manus.

He that perforce robs king of beastss of their Black Marias

May easy win a adult female? s ( 1.1.263-69 ) .

The characters? instead indulgent attitudes towards criminal conversation can besides be seen in King John? s opinion. He proclaims that although Philip is non Lord Faulconbridge? s boy, he is still legitimate because he was conceived in marriage ( 1.1.116-7 ) .

None of the characters in King John of all time protest, or even inquiry, this male-dominated household hierarchy. Bodensee uses it, and the work forces in her life, to carry through her royal scope & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 12303 ; & # 4170 ; & # 27904 ; H & # 28164 ; H & # 29956 ; C & # 12292 ; & # 4170 ; & # 781 ; J & # 4170 ; & # 21760 ; C & # 17156 ; & # 5194 ; & # 13830 ; & # 33032 ; & # 2141 ; & # 4481 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; R with criminal conversation when they become angry. This mind-set reflects the prevalent attitude of the clip? and Shakespeare? s conformance to it.

By contrast, Shakespeare advocates more feminist ideals in The Winter? s Tale, written 14 to seventeen old ages after King John. The adult females in this drama are surely on a more equal terms with their work forces than are the adult females in King John. Clearly, King Leontes? personal felicity and household? s foundation remainder on his queen, Hermione. When he doubts her fidelity, Leontes? peace of head is shattered. He declares, ? Nor dark nor twenty-four hours, no remainder! ? ( 2.3.1 ) . Besides, his household dissolves as a direct consequence of her fidelity being questioned. His boy Mamillius dies of heartache, while his girl Perdita is lost for 16 old ages. Hermione herself is presumed dead for these 16 old ages. The audience is lead to believe that Leontes has inadvertently killed Hermione as sort of penalty for her supposed criminal conversation. However, we subsequently discover that Hermione has been in privacy for 16 old ages, allowing Leontes think her to be dead. Therefore, it is she who punishes him for his dictatorship.

Perdita besides has power in her relationship with the adult male she loves. Prince Florizel announces,

? were I crowned the most imperial sovereign,

Thereof most worthy, were I the fairest young person

That of all time made oculus swerving, had force and

Cognition

More than was of all time adult male? s, I would non value them

Without her love ; for her employ them all,

Commend them and reprobate them to her service

Or to their ain Hell ( 4.4.372-78 ) .

Florizel makes it clear that nil he could of all time trust to hold is deserving anything without Perdita? s love. In King John, non one character so openly admits to another? s power over them through love.

Antigonus and Paulina? s relationship is similarly characterized by equality. When Paulina launches into her philippic, call on the carpeting King Leontes for his baseless green-eyed monster, the King instantly blames Antigonus. He demands of him, ? What, canst non govern her? ? ( 2.3.46 ) , to which Paulina immediately responds, ? ? trust it, / he shall non govern me? ( 2.3.49-50 ) . Later on, Leontes once more blames Antigonus for his married woman? s behaviour, stating, ? And, lozel, thou art worthy to be hanged, / That wilt non remain her lingua? ( 2.3.109-10 ) . Antigonus? retort is to state him, ? Hang all the husbands/That can non make that effort, you? ll leave yourself/ Barely one topic? ( 2.3.110-12 ) . Therefore, in The Winter? s Tale, Shakespeare mocks the old patriarchal household construction. This is a far call from his acceptance of the about feudal values found in King John.

The women’s rightist ideals promoted in The Winter? s Narrative can besides be seen in the male monarchs? relationships with their immature kids. Both Polixenes and Leontes adore their kids. In fact, Mamillius? decease accomplishes what even the Prophet can non by doing Leontes recognize his foolishness. Besides, when Leontes asks Polixenes, ? Are you so fond of your immature prince as we/ Do look to be of ours? ? ( 1.2.164-5 ) , Polixenes responds fierily, stating,

He? s all my exercising, my hilarity, my affair,

Now my sworn friend and so mine enemy,

My parasite, my soldier, solon, all.

He makes a July? s twenty-four hours short as December,

And with his changing childness remedies in me

Ideas that would thick my blood ( 1.2.166-71 ) .

Male sensitiveness and the father-child bond is the impudent side of feminism. In a patriarchal system, no adult male would of all time so admit to his love for and dependance on his kid. In fact, the raising of kids would be wholly relegated to the adult females. An illustration of this can be found in King John? s Arthur, whose exclusive value is as a political pawn. His female parent Constance is the lone 1 who even professes to love him, and even she frequently sees Arthur as a agency to power, and a cause, instead than her boy.

The Winter? s Tale? s characters besides espouse feminist ideals in that they perfectly refuse to surmise their married womans of criminal conversation without cogent evidence. King Leontes is the lone character with a misanthropic position of adult females? s fidelity, and he is mocked and badly punished for it. Shakespeare doesn? t effort to apologize Leontes? irrational green-eyed monster by differences of age or race between him and his married woman. He besides doesn? T explain it with any imprudent behavior by Hermione. Rather, Shakespeare wholly refuses to pardon Leontes? covetous dictatorship. The characters environing Leontes besides hold him accountable. They beg him to recognize his folly. When he persists in it, Leontes is ruthlessly punished. He loses his best friend Polixenes, his advisers Camillo and Antigonus, his boy Mamillius, his girl Perdita, and, of class, Hermione. Leontes finally regains the love of Polixenes, Camillo, Perdita, and Hermione, but Antigonus, Mamillius, and 16 wasted old ages are lost everlastingly. Leontes is Shakespeare? s warning to Elizabethan work forces ; he warns them that unreasonably

covetous hubbies? even male monarchs? can lose everything.

The characters in The Winter? s Tale besides differ from their opposite numbers in King John in that they do non take a charge of criminal conversation lightly. When King Leontes suspects his married woman of rip offing on him, he threatens to hold her burned at the interest, stating, ? Say that she were gone, / Given to the fire, a mediety of my rest/ might come to me once more? ( 2.3.7-9 ) . At her test, he tells Hermione, ? thou/ Shalt experience our justness, in whose easiest passage/ Look for no less than decease? ( 3.2.89-91 ) . Clearly, the characters in The Winter? s Tale hold their married womans much more responsible for their actions than do those in King John.

It is obvious from these two illustrations that in the 14 to seventeen old ages between King John and The Winter? s Tale, Shakespeare? s position of household relationships changed drastically. He originally accepted the position quo. He treated the patriarchal household hierarchy, with its misgiving of married womans? fidelity, as both natural and sensible. However, subsequently in life, Shakespeare came to dispute prevalent sentiment. The households he depicted were more classless and less hierarchical in nature. Besides, he derided excessively covetous hubbies like Leontes, who served as a warning to Elizabethan work forces. However, despite these drastic alterations in Shakespeare? s point of view, some of his sentiments remained the same. For case, he maintains his place against power-based, political household relationships and his belief that household rank International Relations and Security Network? t needfully defined by genetic sciences.

In King John, Shakespeare undeniably critiques power-based and political relationships. In fact, the huge bulk of these familial ties are, at least partially, political in nature. For case, Constance uses more than loves her boy Arthur. She exploits his claim to the throne of England in order to procure herself a place of power. When she hears of Blanche? s matrimony to Lewis, Constance groans, ? France friend with England, what becomes of me? ? ( 3.1.36 ) . Arthur himself doesn? T want the Crown of England ; he declares, ? So I were out of prison and kept sheep, / I should be every bit merry as the twenty-four hours is long? ( 4.1.17-18 ) . Constance merely presses his claim for her ain interest. She would non make this if she genuinely loved her boy, cognizing that it makes him a menace to King John. Tragical & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ;

& # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; WSProfilesRachelApplication DataMicrosoftWordAutoRecovery save of ShakespeareEssay2.asd AmbereC: WINDOWSProfilesRachelAly love each other either. Alternatively, they merely use each other in the game of political relations. King John relies on his female parent? s advice, as when she urges him to get married Blanche to the Dauphin. Eleanor tells him, ? Son, list to this concurrence ; do this lucifer? ( 2.1.469 ) . However, John? s heartache when he hears of her decease is limited to one line, when he says? My female parent dead! ? ( 4.2.183 ) . Indeed, his first reaction to the intelligence is a political 1. He frets, ? What, Mother dead? / How wildly so walks my estate in France! ? ( 4.2.127-8 ) . Obviously, he used her instead than loved her. By the terminal of the drama, they excessively are both dead.

Princess Blanche and Lewis the Dauphin? s matrimony itself is strictly political. King John gives Lewis Blanches? manus in matrimony along with several states in order to win peace with France and to procure his claim to the throne of England. Blanche ne’er pretends that she? s get marrieding out of love. In accepting to the matrimony, Blanches says merely, ? My uncle? s will in this regard is mine./ If he see aught in you that makes him like/ ? I can with easiness translate it to my will? ( 2.1.511-14 ) . ( Immediately subsequently, she corrects herself and replaces the word? will? with? love? ) . Indeed, she tells Lewis that she will non lie and state that everything she sees in him is worthy of love. Alternatively, she merely admits that, ? nil do I see in you, / ? That I can happen should deserve any hatred? ( 2.1.519-21 ) . On the other manus, Lewis makes excessive claims of love, protesting, ? I ne’er loved myself/ Till now infix? vitamin D I beheld myself/ Drawn in the flattering tabular array of her oculus? ( 2.1.502-4 ) . He is, of class, lying to derive the advantage of Blanche? s dowery. Throughout the drama, we see nil in their political matrimony to do us believe that they love each other, or t & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ;

& # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; osoftWordAutoRecovery save of ShakespeareEssay2.asd Amber=C: WINDOWSProfilesRachelMy DocumentsShakespeareEssay2.doc Amber honest characters Arthur and Blanche. Arthur truly loves his female parent? in fact, when he is captured, his first idea is of her. He moans, ? O, this will do my female parent dice with heartache! ? ( 3.1.5 ) . And yet he dies, sacrificed in a political game that he wanted no portion of. There can be small uncertainty that Blanche enters into her matrimony with Lewis for the good of her state, non out of lip service, and yet the last lines we hear from her express her deplorable province. Caught between England and France, she cries, ? I am with both: each ground forces hath a manus, / And in their fury, I holding clasp of both, / They whirl asunder and dismember me? ( 3.1.328-30 ) . When her new hubby advises her that her luck lies with him, Blanche answers, ? There where my luck lives, there my life dies? ( 3.1.338 ) . The Bastard, the lone character who refuses to subject to? titillating Commodity? ( 2.1.574 ) , is besides the lone character left unpunished at the terminal of King John. He shows his household trueness by killing the Duke of Austria ( instead than welcoming him, as Arthur did ) , and by staying with King John, even when it seemed that he? vitamin D murdered Arthur. At the terminal of the drama, he is rewarded with the Ascension of Henry III, who combines political legitimacy with the will to move.

Shakespeare criticizes political household relationships in a really different manner in The Winter? s Narrative: he merely omits them wholly. Hermione candidly loves her hubby, naming his favour? the Crown and comfort of my life? ( 3.2.94 ) . She besides loves her kids really much, depicting them as her? 2nd joy? ( 3.2.96 ) and? 3rd comfort? ( 3.2.98 ) . Leontes likewise loves his household, but his foolish green-eyed monster alienates Perdita and Hermione, and putting to deaths Mamillius. The genuineness of his love is felt in the 5th act, when he is still acutely enduring from the loss of his household, 16 old ages after Hermione? s test and subsequent? death. ? Florizel and Perdita? s love is every bit echt. Florizel refuses to give Perdita up, even after they have fled Bohemia for Sicily, merely to happen that Polixenes has followed them thence. In the face of overpowering hardship, he tells her, ? Though Fortune, seeable an enemy, / Should trail us with my male parent, power no jot/ Hath she to alter our loves? ( 5.1.216-18 ) . The other household relation & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ;

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& # 52736 ; = & # 512 ; & # 7936 ; & # 33536 ; & # 8448 ; & # 4336 ; ionships. Everyone in The Winter? s Tale unfeignedly loves each other. This is as galvanizing and every bit implausible as all of King John? s hypocritical relationships, particularly sing that most of the households depicted in The Winter? s Tale are royal. ( You would anticipate the bulk of royal matrimonies to be political ) .

In decision, by analyzing the familial ties in The Life and Death of King John and The Winter? s Tale, we can see which of Shakespeare? s attitudes about household relationships changed and which remained changeless. In his earlier drama, King John, he adopted the position quo unquestioningly. None of the characters protest their male-dominated society. Bodensee uses the work forces in her life to seek to carry through her aspiration, while the Lady Faulconbridge and Blanche meekly submit to them. Besides, all of the characters presume that married womans can non be every bit faithful as hubbies can. However, they take this unfaithfulness in pace. By contrast, in The Winter? s Tale ( written 14 to sixteen old ages after King John ) , Shakespeare espouses much more feminist ideals. Hermione, Perdita, and Paulina all have power in their relationships with work forces. Another facet of this feminism is the close father-child bond found in Leontes? and Polixenes? relationships with their sons. & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ;

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Body Text Indent & # 33807 ; & # 65356 ; & # 33809 ; & # 720 ; & # 25618 ; & # 480 ; & # 33886 ; & # 65356 ; & # 33888 ; & # 720 ; & # 20850 ; & # 26112 ; ? ? ? & # 31392 ; ? & # 2050 ; ? & # 1863 ; & # 20850 ; & # 958 ; & # 1114 ; & # 1863 ; & # 2821 ; & # 3079 ; & # 3081 ; & # 3123 ; & # 3162 ; & # 3207 ; & # 3262 ; & # 3263 ; & # 3470 ; & # 4203 ; & # 4662 ; & # 4663 ; & # 4709 ; & # 4747 ; & # 4786 ; & # 4829 ; & # 4878 ; & # 4922 ; & # 4961 ; & # 4962 ; & # 5199 ; & # 6024 ; & # 7015 ; & # 7110 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10794 ; & # 10835 ; & # 10847 ; & # 11048 ; & # 11057 ; & # 11354 ; & # 11364 ; & # 11541 ; & # 11550 ; & # 11933 ; & # 11941 ; & # 12163 ; & # 12168 ; & # 12169 ; & # 12177 ; & # 12493 ; & # 12502 ; & # 13302 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 63739 ; & # 17156 ; & # 5706 ; * & # 4170 ; & # 17152 ; & # 5706 ; & # 20480 ; he Winter? s Tale? he omits them wholly. All of the characters, including Leontes, truly love each other.

By researching Shakespeare? s attitudes, we come to cognize him as a radical mind, non merely a dramatist and poet. It becomes clear that Shakespeare himself stood a spot outside of society, much like the figure of the Bastard in King John. He critiques both the patriarchalism and political, hypocritical relationships so rampant in Elizabethan England. From the popularity of his dramas, we can surmise that Shakespeare gathered rather a followers in this radical thought. The lone inquiry remaining is, how much of an impact on Elizabethan society did this invention hold? Although it is impossible to once and for all mensurate Shakespeare? s impact on early modern thought, I steadfastly believe that he for good altered it.