Throughout against innocent protesters and they tried

Throughout the Vietnam War, American citizens held many demonstrations against the U.S stance in the war. Although the most known and controversial demonstration, its disruption did little the to help the U.S, the Democratic National Convention of 1968, occurred during a three day period. After the three days, the end of the demonstration brought about the Chicago Seven and caused a widespread outbreak of disputes. In a newspaper article published on August 19, 1968, a few days before the convention, writer Christopher Chandler stated that the organizers of the demonstration that were to go on during the convention were split on how to proceed with the protest. He mentioned many groups such as the Yippies and the Mobilization Committee that were known as the most radical and planned to play active roles in the protests. In a statement by Mayor Richard J. Daley published on August 29 1968, one day after the protests, he stated that the protester’s use of violence lead to an escalation of intense barbarity and believed that the march was useless towards the primary goal to influence the convention delegates. Throughout his statement Richard refers to the protesters as “terrorist” and describes their actions as “disruptive” and “paralzying” to the city. Another source, a partial rebuttal to the Mayor’s white paper on police disorders by the National Mobilization Committee, responded to Richard Daley’s statement by by accusing him of giving false information. They claimed that the violence was commenced by the police brutality against innocent protesters and they tried to resist against it. These documents help clarify and understand the action point taken to fulfill the demonstrations as well as the negative aftermath. The apparent disagreement between the authorities and the protesters displayed the lack of potent effect the protest had not only in Chicago but in America. Due to the threatening riots, the demonstrations lead to Chicago Seven. Seven protesters who were arrested and charged for riot and conspiracy. Abbie Hoffman, Rennie Davis, Jerry Rubin, David Dellinger, John Froines, Tom Hayden, Bobby Seale, and Lee Weiner were part of large known peace organizations. Their role and goal was to show their stance on their opposition of the Vietnam war to get their message heard. Bobby Seale, was from the Black Panther Party, it was founded by himself and Huey P. Newton . During the time of the convention Huey P.  Newton was in prison for conviction of manslaughter of a cop but Bobby was a speaker at the march. In hopes to spread the group message of determination for civil rights they felt that it was important to participate in the demonstrations during the convention (Britannica). Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin unlike the Black Panther that fought for minorities, they founded the  Yippies in which their main focus was on free speech and anti-war demonstrators (PBS.org). It was a grand time for the Yippies to show their ideologies, during the convention they performed many theoretical plays to demonstrate their opposition. Rennie Davis and Tom Hayden were from the Students for a Democratic Society, a recognized organization that was in favor of of participatory democracy that included all people as part of decision making. They were also known for in their part in civil rights movement but in 1965 their focus point was the tactics against the war (Gitlin). After many long months, on September 24th, 1969 the eight finally went to trial in front of Judge Julius Hoffman. In a report written by Andrew Kopkind, he described the judge as stubborn, as he did not let many testify for the defendants and kicked the only black male out, Bobby Seale. Kopkind came to the conclusion that it was difficult to make the judge understand the occurrence of the demonstrators since such a lengthy timespan had passed since the actual demonstrations (Kopkind). While Bobby Seales was separated from the rest of the defendants, on February 18, Abbie, Jerry, Tom, Rennie, and David, were all convicted on inciting riot, they were sentenced to five years in prison and a $5000 fine. In 1972 the Court Appeal dropped the charges nobody served time (cnn.com). Although Throughout the Vietnam War, American citizens held many demonstrations against the U.S stance in the war. Although the most known and controversial demonstration, its disruption did little the to help the U.S, the Democratic National Convention of 1968, occurred during a three day period. After the three days, the end of the demonstration brought about the Chicago Seven and caused a widespread outbreak of disputes. In a newspaper article published on August 19, 1968, a few days before the convention, writer Christopher Chandler stated that the organizers of the demonstration that were to go on during the convention were split on how to proceed with the protest. He mentioned many groups such as the Yippies and the Mobilization Committee that were known as the most radical and planned to play active roles in the protests. In a statement by Mayor Richard J. Daley published on August 29 1968, one day after the protests, he stated that the protester’s use of violence lead to an escalation of intense barbarity and believed that the march was useless towards the primary goal to influence the convention delegates. Throughout his statement Richard refers to the protesters as “terrorist” and describes their actions as “disruptive” and “paralzying” to the city. Another source, a partial rebuttal to the Mayor’s white paper on police disorders by the National Mobilization Committee, responded to Richard Daley’s statement by by accusing him of giving false information. They claimed that the violence was commenced by the police brutality against innocent protesters and they tried to resist against it. These documents help clarify and understand the action point taken to fulfill the demonstrations as well as the negative aftermath. The apparent disagreement between the authorities and the protesters displayed the lack of potent effect the protest had not only in Chicago but in America. Due to the threatening riots, the demonstrations lead to Chicago Seven. Seven protesters who were arrested and charged for riot and conspiracy. Abbie Hoffman, Rennie Davis, Jerry Rubin, David Dellinger, John Froines, Tom Hayden, Bobby Seale, and Lee Weiner were part of large known peace organizations. Their role and goal was to show their stance on their opposition of the Vietnam war to get their message heard. Bobby Seale, was from the Black Panther Party, it was founded by himself and Huey P. Newton . During the time of the convention Huey P.  Newton was in prison for conviction of manslaughter of a cop but Bobby was a speaker at the march. In hopes to spread the group message of determination for civil rights they felt that it was important to participate in the demonstrations during the convention (Britannica). Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin unlike the Black Panther that fought for minorities, they founded the  Yippies in which their main focus was on free speech and anti-war demonstrators (PBS.org). It was a grand time for the Yippies to show their ideologies, during the convention they performed many theoretical plays to demonstrate their opposition. Rennie Davis and Tom Hayden were from the Students for a Democratic Society, a recognized organization that was in favor of of participatory democracy that included all people as part of decision making. They were also known for in their part in civil rights movement but in 1965 their focus point was the tactics against the war (Gitlin). After many long months, on September 24th, 1969 the eight finally went to trial in front of Judge Julius Hoffman. In a report written by Andrew Kopkind, he described the judge as stubborn, as he did not let many testify for the defendants and kicked the only black male out, Bobby Seale. Kopkind came to the conclusion that it was difficult to make the judge understand the occurrence of the demonstrators since such a lengthy timespan had passed since the actual demonstrations (Kopkind). While Bobby Seales was separated from the rest of the defendants, on February 18, Abbie, Jerry, Tom, Rennie, and David, were all convicted on inciting riot, they were sentenced to five years in prison and a $5000 fine. In 1972 the Court Appeal dropped the charges nobody served time (cnn.com). Although